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Bar Rig Fishing Coho Salmon in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia

Each fall from September to December (autumn if you are English) I manage to get out for a few days of Coho fishing, usually on the weekend, and this year was no exception. One of the places I have fished many times with my son and friends is Two Bit Bar, Fort Langley. Read more…

A Weekend Adventure in the Fraser Canyon, British Columbia

Last summer we spent a glorious extended weekend exploring the Fraser Canyon from Hope to Lytton where the rock formations along the mighty Fraser River push against the rushing waters that tumble through the narrow canyons. Cliffs rise from the edge of the canyon and one can glimpse trains making their way on what seems to be a perilous journey on rail lines seemingly hanging on to the cliff and diving into periodic tunnels through the rock. Read more…

Train Spotting: Highway 1 Lytton to Craigellachie, British Columbia, Canada

We decided to stay at the Kumsheen Rafting Resort located a few kilometres east of Lytton in the scenic Thompson River canyon. Here we were well into BC’s semi-desert country with lofty ponderosa pines and tumbleweeds and the wonderful smell of sage. We chose the well-priced “yurt” – the best of both worlds, sleeping in a tent with comfortable bed and solid deck below. We had a fabulous meal on the patio of Cutting Board Restaurant and bonus – we could hear the westbound CPR trains just below the resort as well as the eastbound CNR trains across the canyon. Read more…

Train Spotting: Highway 1 Vancouver to Lytton in British Columbia, Canada

I have been a “foamer”–that is a fanatical train buff since I was a kid in Edmonton (1950’s), and I never miss an opportunity to watch and experience trains whenever I can. Travelling east from Vancouver to the Rockies at the Alberta border has given me many wonderful opportunities to view and experience Canada’s major trains. The Canadian Pacific (CPR) is the trans-continental railway that was first built in the 1880s to secure British Columbia as part of Canada. Highway 1 parallels the CPR most of the way through the Province and there are many spots well worth stopping at to be a regular Train Spotter; and a terrific bonus is that we get to experience trains in some of the most spectacular scenery in the world. Read more…

Boston Bar and North Bend the Railway Center of the Fraser Canyon, BC, Canada

The Fraser Canyon is a stretch of the mighty Fraser River where the rock formations try to conquer the water.  A few kilometres north from Hell’s Gate along Highway 1, the narrowest section of the Canyon, my wife and I reached Boston Bar and sister village North Bend. Both of these communities are engaging stops to explore the more recent history of the Fraser Canyon. Read more…

Fraser Canyon adventures, British Columbia

I have recently become newly enamored of the Fraser Canyon region in British Columbia. Growing up in the Lower Mainland, my family often camped in the Canyon when I was a kid, but it wasn’t until more recently that I began to appreciate the history and natural features of the area. Here are my top recommendations for a weekend getaway to the Fraser Canyon and beyond.

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The Lower Fraser Canyon, British Columbia

According to Wikipedia the Fraser Canyon is “an 84 km landform of the Fraser River where it descends rapidly through narrow rock gorges in the Coast Mountains en route from the Interior Plateau of British Columbia to the Fraser Valley.”  For Suzan and I it is a beautiful place to drive through enroute to the interior of BC. Read more…

Fishing Furry Creek for Pink Salmon

I have been hooked on fishing since a young age, when I use to fish the creeks and oceans of Cornwall, England. Now I live and work in Canada and fish annually for salmon, unfortunately as work permits.

Every two years in the odd year (2013, 2015 etc.) the Pink salmon phenomenon occurs in Southern BC. Large numbers of Pinks (as they are affectionately known) approximately 10 million, or Humpies as they are called by some as the males grow a hump on the back, return to the rivers such as the Fraser and smaller tidal rivers such as the Squamish to spawn.  These salmon swim in large schools and are relatively easy to catch from the shore by all ages. They generally range in size from 3 to 7 lbs and put up a reasonable fight on light tackle. Read more…