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Setting up Camp with Toddlers

Let me begin by stating the obvious: camping with a toddler is challenging. It is not for the faint of heart, although it is highly rewarding if you are up for it. Here are some of my recent findings: Read more…

Five useful knots for campers and hikers enjoying British Columbia’s outdoors

If you camp and hike, chances are you have pitched a tarp, tied down your tent’s fly in a storm, or bagged up your food and hung it from a tree, out of the reach of hungry bears. You may have learned to tie a few useful knots from your days in Scouts, or from your experience sailing or climbing. If, like me, you have never learned proper knot tying techniques, you risk your safety and convenience around camp. With the right basic knowledge and some practice, a number of knots can improve safety, security and the overall outdoor experience. Read more…

Packing a Lightweight Backpack to go Hiking Overnight

You have identified a one-night hike in the woods. Assuming you have chosen your sleeping bag, tent, and appropriate hiking boots – and yes, those choices can be torturous! – Your next step is to fill your pack with the necessities for a short trip in the wilderness. In addition to survival basics – like a map and compass, water, food, a place to cook it, and a flashlight – how do you know what you will and won’t need? Read more…

Campfire Cocktails and Hot Drinks

If you are an avid camper, you probably already have a go-to drink for sharing stories around the campfire. Whether you prefer a strong cup of tea or coffee, rich hot chocolate or something a little stronger, drinks are part of the campfire experience. Read more…

Adventures in Waterproofing for Camping in British Columbia

Camping in BC gives new meaning to the term ‘waterproof’. Most items sold with this claim are simply, well, not waterproof. Spend a weekend in a rainy campsite or hiking on the trail and you will know what I am talking about. There is really no way to stay 100% dry when you commit to staying outside in the wet weather. Even if it doesn’t rain on you, morning dew, condensation and even sweat can … ahem, dampen your spirits on a camping trip. So, aside from lowering your expectations, here are some of my tips for waterproofing your gear: Read more…

Campground Road Trip to Penticton, BC, Canada

On the crisp sunny morning of April 23rd I picked up my rental car in Coquitlam and headed to the Okanagan. The purpose of my journey was to attend the Interior RV Consumer Show, being held that weekend in Penticton, to distribute camping packages with tourism directories listing places to camp.  Along the way I had the opportunity to tour a few campgrounds and stay overnight in a cabin. Read more…

Spring Motorcycle Overnighter Parrys RV Park, Parksville, British Columbia

Motorcycle camping and touring is increasing in popularity but like RV’s it’s great to do an overnighter as preparation before the longer tour.

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How to Camp With a Baby without Crying Like One

My partner and I are both avid campers. He does most of the heavy lifting, and I like to organize all of our gear and look for interesting trails and diversions in one of our many books of BC maps. We have enjoyed many nights in off-the-beaten track campsites around the province, hunkered down to play cards by candle light, enjoying a meal cooked on an open flame. Read more…

A Road through the Past: Douglas Road / In-SHUCK-Ch Trail

My family is a bit of an adventurous bunch. In the last two years, we have covered a lot of ground; from the Island to the East Kootenays and many stops in between. There is one road trip, however, that never fails to impress even our most adventurous friends, and the memories will last us a lifetime (or at least until our next visit). No ordinary Sunday drive, the Douglas Road traces the Lillooet river from Pemberton/Mount Currie all the way to Port Douglas, at the north end of  Harrison Lake.

The route is accessible by any vehicle in the summer as far south as the hot springs. Beyond that, and certainly in other seasons, a 4WD with sufficient ground clearance is required. Always check road conditions, be prepared with food and warm clothes in case of an unplanned delay, and let people know where you are traveling  and when you intend to return. The road is gravel most of the way, and susceptible to pot holes, etc. The west side of Harrison Lake is a notoriously rough road.

My partner, a BC history buff, as long been eager to see this historic wagon road. In the 1850s, it served as an early gold rush trail for a handful of years only, until the new route through the Fraser Canyon was completed. By the late 1850s, the Douglas Road was largely abandoned, and the town of Yale grew instead of Port Douglas. Read more…

Osoyoos in the Okanagan

The town of Osoyoos has been a popular summer vacation spot as far back as I can remember. It’s about a 5 hour drive from the Vancouver area, and even as a kid I knew the route. Drive along Highway 1 until Hope. Turn off onto the Hope-Princeton Highway (Highway 3). Stay on it until you reach Osoyoos. Read more…

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